Most often, virtual assistants enter the digital workforce as freelancers. They have the administrative skill set to help business owners with behind-the-scenes tasks like email management, social media development, organization, etc. And they have the caretaking, detail-oriented genes that are needed for this kind of work.

I know many VAs who have gotten into the business because they’re sick of what they’re doing in the corporate world but they want to continue to contribute to the household finances.

Or maybe they’ve decided to stay home with the kids and find that they’re happier when they’re making an impact outside the home too. The flexibility of working remotely is a huge draw.

But as they start to work with clients and grow their skills, they eventually find that they can take on more work than they originally thought. They start to niche down, then raise prices. Until the market can’t take another price increase or they run out of time.

This can be a frustrating place for an ambitious VA to be. But it’s also a very profitable spot, if played right.

How to uplevel as a virtual assistant

If you’re a VA taking on higher-level tasks and projects, it’s time to consider upleveling your business.Click To Tweet

VAs who take on more than one role for a business owner are usually qualified to serve as a business manager. As they take on more leadership roles for the CEO, they can move into a chief of staff role. And if they’re an integrator for the business owner, that operations role will supersede the VA role.

If this is you, someone who sees their role grow client by client, contract by contract, it might be time to strategically work toward upleveling your VA business.

It takes time, and you might find yourself splitting your time between VA tasks and higher-level tasks. But keep at it and keep the following tips in mind.

Keep your initial contract short

Contracts are vital for all businesses, and it’s tempting to want to start with a long-term contract when working with a new client. After all, that guarantees recurring income for you.

But as you’re just getting started with someone new, I recommend keeping your contracts short–especially if you see a shift in your services coming. A 3-month contract allows you time to develop in your new role while becoming more valuable to the business owner. And it’s easier to re-negotiate your services and rates at the end of a contract period, rather than midway through. You want to leave space open for you to grow and develop into a larger role, if that’s something you desire.

A shorter contract allows you to grow into a position with more ROI for your client.Click To Tweet

Document your value

The people you work for want to know that you’re contributing value to their businesses, that your ROI is worth it. Sometimes that value is hidden behind the scenes.

Keep track of the results you’ve helped impact in the business, whether it’s peace of mind, direct sales, saving time or something else. Really quantify the projects you’ve completed. What wouldn’t have gotten done without you? You can do this in the form of a monthly report that you send to clients or within your regular check-in calls.

Communicate effectively with current and prospective clients

If upleveling is on your mind, think about how you’re communicating your services to others. Calling yourself a virtual assistant feels very entry-level. Make sure that your skills align with what you’re doing for clients. If your services and expertise go well beyond entry-level administrative services by managing others, serving in a tech role or serving as an integrator, make sure you communicate that.

Upleveling isn’t for everyone. If you’re perfectly happy where you are right now or don’t have it in you to grow, kudos to you for acknowledging that. But when you’re ready, take that leap!

If you feel ready now, I invite you to check out my Director of Operations certification program that starts in just a few weeks! You’ll get the training and guidance you need to make the shift, and have the certification to prove that you’re worth the investment.

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